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Nobody can deny that Indian society is still imperfect. And that women continue to bear the brunt of bias every day – in big and small ways. The best change comes organically, from within our families and communities.
No one can argue that our festivals display a gender bias — the woman ties the rakhi, the woman fasts, the woman cooks the special meal (Sonu Mehta/HT PHOTO) PREMIUM
No one can argue that our festivals display a gender bias — the woman ties the rakhi, the woman fasts, the woman cooks the special meal (Sonu Mehta/HT PHOTO)
Updated on Nov 05, 2021 07:46 PM IST
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By Shunori Ramanathan and Swati Ramanathan

“Another festival just for the men in our lives!”, one of us exclaimed over one of our cross-continental zoom calls when the other mentioned the practically unknown Kutchi festival of Veer Pasli, one she grew up observing. Every year, girls faithfully go their brother’s home and tie a sacred saffron thread around his wrist, singing protective chants to drive away any demons that might attack him.

As a cross-cultural family (Kutchi Jain and Palghat Iyer), we have a delightful cross-section of Indian festivals to mark our rich heritage. As a mother-daughter duo, we have passionately celebrated most of these festivals. Diwali is a special one for us; we spend the week leading up making gugra, khandvi and other recipes passed down through generations. ,design your basketball uniform

Rakhi is another important festival in our family. Though neither of us live in the same city as our brothers, it hasn’t stopped the annual ritual of couriered messages and rakhi threads every August, celebrating sibling love in a special family ritual. Whatever its historical roots may have been, Rakhi has been modernised and adapted for today’s times, and still hold a timeless charm for their eternal message of sibling love.,volleyball libero look like

It’s been hiding in plain sight all this time. But something about the string of events this year opened our third eye. Rakhi this year came on August 22, one week after Independence Day. Then there was Karva Chauth, which came on the day of the forgettable India-Pakistan world cup T20 match. And this Saturday, November 6 is Bhai Dooj – or what we Gujaratis call Bhai Beej.,tennis outfit dames

soccer prediction competition,What’s common across all these festivals? Women celebrating the men in their lives. Rakhi, Veer Pasli, and Bhai Dooj are for brothers. Karva Chauth is for husbands. Rakhi has the sister tying the rakshabandhan on her brothers’ wrists, to bless and protect them – the brothers in return promise to “take care” of their sisters. Bhai Dooj is the sister preparing an elaborate meal with all her brothers’ favourite dishes. And Karva Chauth has the wife on a fast until the full moon appears.

basketball hoop manufacturer malaysia,There is always some justification for these festivals — that in ancient times, the men would go off to battle, and the women (wives or sisters) would pray for their safety, or that it is a way for sisters to get a vacation away from the toiling at their in-laws. But the best customs are those that been constantly exfoliated with the values of our times.

Navaratri in Gujarat is a vibrant week-long garba-raas extravaganza that has adopted and adapted the latest Bollywood music and other genres, without compromising on the essential folk character of the festival. It’s become so popular that it’s now being celebrated across the country.,american football uniform

basketball hoop manufacturer malaysia,No one can argue that our festivals display a gender bias — the woman ties the rakhi, the woman fasts, the woman cooks the special meal. Time for the men to do something for a change. Last year, we discussed turning our family Rakhi celebration into a mutual exchange of threads and vows to protect. But while we all agreed in principle, it felt like this compromise was missing the mark. So this is what we have come up with — let’s keep Raksha Bandhan and Karva Chauth the way they are.

sogndal fc,But let’s modernise Bhai Dooj, let’s call it Behen Dooj. The brother takes the trouble – cooks an elaborate meal for his sister(s); takes them out, makes them feel special. For all that she’s done for him. For the love and affection she showers on him throughout the year. For the handmade rakhis she makes and ties every year.

For those crusty conservatives who say, “You can’t mess with tradition”, we say, “Not all traditions are sacred. Remember Sati?” The best traditions are those that resonate with people and reflect the best values of a society. ,kingpin handball

tennis outfit damen nike,Nobody can deny that Indian society is still imperfect. And that women continue to bear the brunt of bias every day – in big and small ways. The best change comes organically, from within our families and communities. They aren’t wrought by law or enforced by the State. Imagine what this could do to our gender relations, if we could root our modern challenges in a cultural context.

So this year, after we celebrate the wonderful Festival of Lights, which so remarkably symbolises the victory of good over evil, let us create a new cultural tradition: A brother’s love for his sister. Behen Dooj. The time has come.,soccer goal size for u10

Shunori Ramanathan is an actress based in New York

Swati Ramanathan is co-founder of Jana Group

The views expressed are personal

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